Single-leg box squat

Level

Advanced

Muscle Groups

Planes of Motion

Outer Unit

Necessary Material

Progression Material

Objective

The most difficult single-leg exercise is the single-leg box squat. Because of the bigger range of motion compared to the single-leg squat, more strength and balance are required to be able to perform this exercise. A high demand is placed on the eccentric strength to turn the descending phase into a concentric contraction.

Many injuries occur during the eccentric (the negative) phase of the movement. Therefore the emphasis on the eccentric contraction will strengthen your muscles and joints in a way that will help to prevent injuries as well as improve performance.

Starting Position

Assume a single-leg stance on a box.

Execution

Squat down by flexing the knee. Keep the heel on the bench. Minimize the movement at the ankle.

As you squat down, raise your arms to shoulder height as a counterbalance.

Squat down until the thigh is parallel to the floor. Then squat back up using only the leg you are balancing on.

Coaching Keys

Make sure the knee does not move beyond the toes when squatting down and up. Start the movement by flexing the knee. Minimize the movement at the ankle.

Do not let the knee of the supporting leg move inward. Make sure it tracks over the second and third toe, staying well aligned between hip and ankle.

Variations

The single-leg overhead box squat promotes core strength and stability and develops single-leg strength, stability and balance.

  • Single-leg overhead box squat

    The single-leg overhead box squat is an advanced level exercise to promote core strength and stability and develop single-leg strength, stability and balance.